Young Adults Still Read Magazines

Young adults read more consumer magazines than older people, according to a summer 2006 study by McPheters & Co. cited in MediaDaily News.
In the six months prior to the study, respondents said they had read an average of 29.3 specific magazine issues. Adults ages 19 to 24 read an average of 30.9 issues, and 25-to-34-year-olds read an average of 33.3 issues. Readership declined after age 34, and those 65 and older had read an average of only 25 issues in the previous six months.
John McPheters of McPheters & Co. said young adults “reported that they read a larger number of both different magazine titles and specific magazine issues than their older counterparts.
“This evidence speaks directly to the growing concern that younger audiences are abandoning the hard-copy magazines for the Internet and other forms of media. It simply has not happened.”

Culture Shock on Madison Avenue

madison.jpgNow this is an excellent article on the status quo that the advertising industry is in today. The old school agencies are struggling to get their proposition right. And all kind of new ventures are out their to make that exercise even harder. This article by someone called Mr. Frog (a search professional) hits the nail. Although I do not agree on the issue that creativity and a big idea is hard to find online. The spectrum is wider than search and bannering, Mr. Frog! Read more

Transparency: Tiranny or Triumph?

ftalk.gifTrendwatching.com is coining ‘Transparency Tyranny’ as one of the top 5 trends for 2007. In fact, this trend is going on while the Internet is growing to be the platform for people to share experiences on products they bought (Askanowner, Kieskeurig and likewise), travels they made (Flyertalk, Igougo and Tripadvisor) and places they eat (Iens).
The question Tiranny or Triumph will be answered depending on the side where you are on: as a company who doesn’t care about what customers’ involvement will do for your brand, you will consider transparency as a tyranny. As a customer you will embrace this transparency as a triumph that you are likely willing to participate in, because of the beauty it brings (being well informed, not going to spend money on inferior products/services). But wait! There are companies that actually understand what is happening and that DO take care of their brands: these type of companies are learning today that Transparency in fact might lead to Triumph on their marketplace. At least there is something along where they can actually make a difference!

KLM launches social networks

klm.pngAll major airlines use frequent flyer programs to stimulate customer loyalty and generate additional revenues through third-party offerings. However, KLM is the first airline worldwide to create a customer-centric online community. The airline has launched passenger-driven communities that connect people doing business in China and Africa: KLM Club China and KLM Club Africa. A degree of exclusivity is guaranteed, since participation is by invitation only. Read more

Imperfection as standard?

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I’m having problems with the following approach:

From ‘Reclaim Your Life: A Two-Week Challenge to Help You Regain Time’ by Stuart R. Levine

Consider the way new technologies come to market. The major software and electronics companies cut down on time and costs by putting products on the market before they’ve been completely debugged. Not only does this save the consumer money in the long run; consumer feedback teaches these companies more in a month than they’d discover through years of in-house testing. Sure, some users might grumble at flaws in the early models or releases. But by now, most consumers are aware of the practice and know to wait for the updated version.

This manifesto is available from ChangeThis.

My problem is the easy conclusion about on “some users that might grumble at flaws”. These early adopters are the ones that feed the companies with worthwhile feedback. In forums online. On ‘Company-X-sucks.com-websites’. At the callcenters etc. Based on this feedback the product/service is then updated. The calculating masses wait for this moment. But the engaged few that paid the big bucks are not ‘paid’ for their effort. In my opinion, they will eventually stop being this ‘helpful’ (read: exploited). Thus: no quick fixes, no updated products, no lower prices. And hence: no critical mass to make your profit on… Just a thought.change.jpg
I’m having problems with the following approach:

From ‘Reclaim Your Life: A Two-Week Challenge to Help You Regain Time’ by Stuart R. Levine

Consider the way new technologies come to market. The major software and electronics companies cut down on time and costs by putting products on the market before they’ve been completely debugged. Not only does this save the consumer money in the long run; consumer feedback teaches these companies more in a month than they’d discover through years of in-house testing. Sure, some users might grumble at flaws in the early models or releases. But by now, most consumers are aware of the practice and know to wait for the updated version.

This manifesto is available from ChangeThis.

My problem is the easy conclusion about on “some users that might grumble at flaws”. These early adopters are the ones that feed the companies with worthwhile feedback. In forums online. On ‘Company-X-sucks.com-websites’. At the callcenters etc. Based on this feedback the product/service is then updated. The calculating masses wait for this moment. But the engaged few that paid the big bucks are not ‘paid’ for their effort. In my opinion, they will eventually stop being this ‘helpful’ (read: exploited). Thus: no quick fixes, no updated products, no lower prices. And hence: no critical mass to make your profit on… Just a thought.

Contact centers only cost

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Satisfaction of call centre customers may be going down hill. While the Global Contact Centre Benchmarking Report 2006 highlighted that contact centres were putting call centre customers first by addressing service levels as a priority. The preliminary findings for the 2007 Benchmarking Report cast doubt on this commitment.
The 2007 report indicates that there has been a significant decrease in the levels of customer satisfaction, regardless of location, with the overall score down to 68.3% from 82% in the previous report.
The highest decrease in satisfaction was in Asia-Pacific where satisfaction fell from 84% to 61.9%, a staggering 22.1%. North America didn’t fare much better with customer satisfaction levels falling 21.1%. In Europe customer satisfaction levels fell 8.6%, with the lowest fall being recorded in Africa and Middle East with a 7.7% decrease in customer satisfaction. The same report also shows that a good 60% of all companies look at their contact/call centers as fee-burning activities. So: all word and no play? The truth is: you can actually learn from customers that make the call. And then acting upon that knowledge might save one or more pennies in other departments…